Little Giant Auto. Sump Pump 54 GPM 4/10 HP 10'Cord # 8-CIA (508157)

Little Giant Auto. Sump Pump 54 GPM 4/10 HP 10'Cord # 8-CIA (508157) (D)<br>
Item# LGI-PMP-8CIA (508157)
List: $360.37
Value Priced $236.44
Availability: ships the next business day

Description

Little Giant Big John Series automatic sump pump with epoxy coated cast iron housing. Polypropylene base and polycarbon cover. Oil filled motor with thermal overload protection. Integral non-adjustable pressure actuated diaphragm level switch.

Specifications

Inlet: Screened bottom may be removed for easy cleaning, Outlet: 1-1/2" MNPT (includes 1-1/4 FMNT bushing) Electrical: 115 volts, 1 phase, 60 Hz, 4/10 HP, 10 amps, 830 Watts, 10' vented power cord Automatic operation: Turns on at 7 -10", off at 1"-4" Minimum sump diameter: 11" Dimensions: 6" high, 9.5" long, 8.5" wide. Weight: 20.25 lbs


• Sump Pumps Technical Data

• Sump Pump Accessories


Pump Capacity Table 68-CIA (508157)
Model HP Head In Feet Shut-off
5' 10' 15' 20'
Gallons Per Minutes (GPM)
68-CIA (508157) 4/10 54 42 26 7.5 23'

LGI-PMP-BJS8-Sump-Bulletin.pdf
LGI-PMP-BJS8-Sump-Manual.pdf
SSPMA-Homeowners-Guide-to-Domestic-Sump-Pump.pdf
SSPMA-Sump-Pump-Installation-Guide.pdf

Questions & Answers

Who needs a sump pump?
If you have a basement that floods you need one. A sump pump in your home will prevent basement, laundry areas, and storage rooms from receiving water damage.
What is the most common cause of sump pump failure?
Probably the most common cause of sump pump failure is electrical in nature. Plugging the pump into an extension cord, or an outlet that shares a circuit breaker with other electrical items, can cause the pump to receive low voltage. In order to run it then has to draw higher amps. That causes the pump to run hotter. Heat is the enemy of electric motors and can shorten the life of a pump dramatically. The pump should be plugged directly into an outlet (no extension cords) and that the outlet is the only thing powered by the circuit breaker (or fuse) that feeds it.
What is grounding?
Grounding Information In the event of a malfunction or breakdown, grounding provides a path of least resistance for electricity to follow. The pumps are equipped with an electric cord having a grounding conductor and a 3 pronged grounding plug. The plug must be plugged into a matching outlet, properly installed and grounded, in accordance with all local codes and ordinances and National Electrical Cod (NEC)
Can I modify the electric cord provided?
Do not modify the plug provided. If it will not fit the outlet, have a proper outlet installed by a qualified licensed electrician (a Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter is recommended) . Do not remove the ground prong from the plug.
What other problems could cause sump pump failure?
The Power is Out; the pump has Insufficient capacity to handle the amount of water entering the sump pit; the pump has not been installed correctly; The check valve is stuck or not installed properly; The float switch is stuck or not installed properly; the pump has not been maintained correctly; the pump is old and worn out; the pump is clogged or seized up; the discharge pipe is clogged or frozen
How do I know what size sump pump I need?
What you need to consider is horsepower not size. The horsepower requirement for a house is determined by the area of drainage connected to the sump, the depth to the groundwater, the depth of the basement, and a few other factors. A 1/3 hp pump is standard for most houses.
Why would I need a Sump Pump?
Houses located in flat or low lying areas where rain and melting snow saturate the ground often experience wet basements. As water pressure builds up around the foundation of the house, it will seek the path of least resistance through cracks in walls or floors. The result is a flooded basement. Although Basement Waterproofing Systems are many and varied, a Sump Pump is most effective in controlling excessive groundwater. It collects the water from around the house or under the basement through a series of pipes that empty into a Sump Pit. The Sump Pit is placed below the lowest point in the basement, and it depends on a Sump Pump to expel the water and keep the basement dry. Many communities are now requiring the installation of a Sump Pump System in new construction.
Should I install a high water alarm?
An alarm is suggested to warn of high water condition resulting from control, pump or system malfunction. Alarms may be audible and/or visual, as appropriate for maximum effect. The power supply for the alarm must be on a separate circuit so that circuit interruption to the pump will not affect the alarm circuit. Alarm activation level must be between the pump turn-on level and the bottom of the inlet.
Can I use a sump pump for my waterfall, koi pond, or garden pond aeration?
No. Sump pumps are designed for short periods of operation. Running a sump pump for too long can cause the pump to overheat. It is also oil-filled. If fish waste attacks the pump seals, or it overheats, that oil can be discharged into your water feature. That will kill the fish and plants. When it cools, it will draw water up inside the pump motor which will kill the pump. Using a sump pump any place where water recirculates is not recommended and will void the warranty.
How should the sump pump be grounded?
In the event of a malfunction or breakdown, grounding provides a path of least resistance for the electricity to follow. This pump is equipped with an electric cord having a grounding conductor and a 3 pronged grounding plug. The plug must be plugged into a matching outlet, properly installed and grounded, in accordance with all local codes and ordinances and National Electrical Code (NEC).
Can I modify the cord plug; it does not fit my outlet?
Do not modify the plug provided. If it will not fit the outlet, have the proper outlet installed by a qualified and competent electrician. Do not remove the ground prong from the plug.
Where should I locate the electrical outlet?
Locate the electrical outlet within reach of the pump power cord. The receptacle should be located 4 feet above the basement floor to help reduce the possibility of immersion.
Can I use an extension cord?
DO NOT USE EXTENSION CORDS. Extension cords can present a safety hazard if the insulation gets damaged or the connection end drops into the sump and contacts the water. Extension cords that are too long or too light do not deliver sufficient voltage to the pump motor.
Where can I find the required voltage information?
The required voltage information is located on the pump nameplate. Check to be certain the voltage source is the same as that required by the pump motor.
What are the typical electrical recommendations?
Make certain the electrical supply circuit is equipped with fuses or circuit breakers of adequate capacity to operate the pump motor. The required amperage information is located on the pump nameplate. A separate branch circuit is recommended and shall be sized according to the National Electrical Code.
Should I wear eye protection when handling a sump pump?
Yes you should….The operation of any pump can result in foreign objects being thrown into the eyes, which can result in severe eye damage. Always wear safety goggles suitable for the application.
Should I install a sump pump high water alarm?
An alarm is suggested to warn of high-water condition resulting from control, pump or system malfunction. Alarms may be audible and/or visual, as appropriate for maximum effect. The power supply for the alarm shall be a separate circuit so that circuit interruption to the pump will not affect the alarm circuit. Alarm activation level must be between the pump turn-on level and the bottom of the inlet.
Can I use a sump pump in septic tank to handle effluent or raw sewage?
Never……., Do not use sump pumps in septic tanks to handle effluent or raw sewage. Do not use sump pumps in hazardous locations or use them to handle flammable liquids. Do not discharge laundry waste into sump pit. Use separate laundry pump and separate discharge.
How should the sump pit be constructed?
The sump pit shall not be less than 18 inches diameter and 24 inches deep, unless otherwise specifically recommended by the manufacturer. The pit shall be accessible and located such that all drainage flows into the pit due to gravity. The sump pit may be constructed of tile, concrete, steel, plastic or other suitable materials as approved by local codes. The pit bottom shall be solid and provide permanent support for the pump. The sump pit shall be fitted with a removable cover adequate to support anticipated loads in the area of use and to prevent refuse from entering the pit.
How is a sump pit installed?
If you are installing a new sump: Locate the sump approximately 6” from the basement wall in the lowest point of the Basement floor; with chalk, mark out the diameter on the floor; cut through the floor with masonry drill or other concrete cutting tool and excavate below the floor to the required depth; level the bottom and set sump pit in place. Tie in any sub-floor drains; backfill and mortar tile or sump pit in place. The top should be flush with the floor for surface drainage unless otherwise specified by codes; It is recommended that the bottom of the tile be provided with a concrete base. However, a concrete block or bricks may be used to provide a support for the sump pump.
How is a sump pump installed?
Clean any debris from the pit and set the sump pump in place. A solid bottom is required to prevent clogging of the pump from sand and dirt; Locate the pump in the pit so that the pump housing and any float control will not come in contact with the side of the pit and create operational problems. Sump pumps can be piped to discharge into the house drainage system, to a dry well or splash block, or to a storm drain depending on local plumbing codes. Do not connect the sump pump discharge to the sewage system.
How to install a sump pump discharge piping?
The discharge piping should be as short as possible, with a minimum number of turns, to reduce pipe friction losses. It is recommended that the discharge pipe diameter be equal to or larger than the discharge size of the pump. Smaller pipe diameters will piping should be as short as possible, with a minimum number of turns, to reduce pipe friction losses. It is recommended that the discharge pipe diameter be equal to or larger than the discharge size of the pump. Smaller pipe diameters will restrict the capacity of the pump. Do not connect with anything less than the size of the discharge tapping of the sump pump.
Should I use a PVC male adaptor or a PVC nipple on the pump discharge?
The motor vibration can break a male adapter installed on the sump pump discharge……always use a PVC nipple instead of a male adapter.
What valves and or fittings should I install on the pump discharge?
Always install a union in the discharge line just above the sump pit to allow easy removal of the pump for cleaning or repair. The installation of a check valve and a ball valve are required by most codes and ordinances to prevent backflow of water into the sump.
Why should a drill a small hole in the discharge piping between the pump and the check valve?
A relief hole (1/8” or 3/16” diameter) should be drilled in the discharge pipe. This hole should be located below the floor line between the pump discharge and the check valve. Unless such a relief hole is provided, a bottom intake pump could “air lock” and will not pump water even though it will run.
Power cord is too long, can I cut it?
No…. With tie straps or pipe strapping, or other suitable device, secure the cord to the discharge pipe making sure not to kink or severely bend the cord where it exits the pump. Do not allow the cord to interfere with the electrical cord, to drape around the motor nor sucked into pump suction. With tie straps or pipe strapping, or other suitable device, secure the cord to the discharge pipe making sure not to kink or severely bend the cord where it exits the pump.
Should I install a sump cover?
Install a sump cover. A cover will help prevent solid matter from falling into the sump, help control odors, and help guard against accidental injury.
Can I do the electrical work?
All electrical work must be performed by a qualified technician. Always follow the National Electrical Code (NEC), or the Canadian Electrical Code, as well as all local, state and provincial codes. The pump must be connected to a dedicated electrical circuit protected by a properly sized circuit breaker or fuses. Install a disconnect where required by code. Code questions should be directed to your electrical inspector.
Can I cut off the cord plug?
No….Pumps and floats equipped with a 3-prong grounded plug must be connected to a 3-wire receptacle. Do not attach to extensions or connectors without a 3-prong grounded plug. Removing the plug from the power cord is not allowable per NEC code. Removing the plug will void the agency listing and the factory warranty.
Should I test the operation of the sump pump system regularly?
Sump pumps are designed to operate intermittently and usually seasonally. It is recommended that you test the pump before your rainy season begins to insure that the pump and switch are operating properly. It is important to check your sump pump regularly to make sure that it is in proper working condition. Remove the cover and slowly pour water into the sump tank.; watch for the "float" to rise and trigger the pump; once the pump is engaged, the water level will quickly lower and the float will shut off the pump. This is what is called "a normal sump cycle".
Should an alarm and back-up system be added to the system?
We suggest installing a high water alarm system and a battery back-up pump system for finished basements or areas where flooding will cause property damage. A back-up generator is another option you can discuss with your pump installer. Most power outages occur during rain storms, just when you need your sump pump the most! Pump manufacturer's warranties cover only the pump. Labor and incidental expenses are not included in the warranties
What is a water powered sump pump?
A water powered sump pump runs off the water pressure from your home plumbing system. It has the same float-activated switch as the electric sump pump types, and handles water at a comparable rate. Since the water-powered pump requires no electricity to operate, it is installed alongside an electric sump and used as a backup system during a power failure.
Are there any problems with replacing a 1/3 hp pump w a 1/2 hp pump?
When used in similar conditions, a 1/2 hp pump will pump more water and lift it higher than a 1/3 hp pump. Most new sump pumps will have a chart or graph in the instructions or on the box that shows the flow versus height of lift for both sizes. The flow is usually given in either gallons per minute or gallons per hour (multiply gpm by 60 to convert to gph). The height of lift is given in feet of vertical lift. There shouldn't be any problem, but where the flow into the sump is relatively slow there would be no advantage to using the larger pump. However, in situations where water flow can become rapid, a 1/2 hp pump may be able to keep up with the flow where a 1/3 hp pump may not.
Do sump pumps have filters which need to be cleaned or replaced?
Sump pumps do not have filters, but they do have screens or small openings where the water enters the pump. These can sometimes be plugged.
Can or should I pump into a sewer drain or basement floor drain?
No, you should not. If you have a septic system, under no circumstances should the sump be pumped into the basement floor drain. During wet conditions the drainfield of the septic system is usually saturated & struggling to handle the normal flow of water from the house. Adding to it with a sump pump can damage the septic system. Even if you are connected to a public system the sump should not be pumped into a floor drain. Putting additional water into the sewer system can overload the public system and there may be a regulation against pumping into it.
Is it OK to dump the laundry water discharge into the sump pit?
Most sump pumps are designed for clear, clean ground water. The chemicals in laundry discharge can attack the seals on a sump pump. It’s possible for lint and other things discharged to get stuck in the impeller area and jam up the pump. Additionally, the soap scum that can be left behind from laundry water can foul the switch – this is particularly true of vertical switches. We recommend you purchase an effluent pump if you need to pump out laundry water.
Who needs a sump pump?
If you have a basement that floods you need one. A sump pump in your home will prevent basement, laundry areas, and storage rooms from receiving water damage.
How do I know what size sump pump I need?
What you need to consider is horsepower not size. The horsepower requirement for a house is determined by the area of drainage connected to the sump, the depth to the groundwater, the depth of the basement, and a few other factors. A 1/3 hp pump is standard for most houses. What is the most common reason for sump pump failure? The leading cause for a sump pump to fail tends to be a switching problem. Sometimes the pump can shift inside the basin causing the float that operates the switch to lodge against its side. Debris can also be a factor; it can interfere with the action of the pump switch. It is important to make sure that your pump switch and float arm assembly move freely.
Can the pump burn out if the outdoor pipe is frozen shut?
In that type of situation it will generally overheat if not remedied. Almost all sump pump motors have thermal protection built in. The thermal relay will reset itself when turned off, and thus be allowed to cool down. The on and off cycling could “burn” the motor windings.
How do I check my pump to see if it’s working?
if your pump is equipped with a piggyback-style plug (where the pump plugs into the back or side of the switch plug) then you can unplug the pump’s plug and put it directly into the power outlet. The pump should immediately run. It will continue to run as long as you leave it plugged in this way. Do not leave it plugged in for more than a few minutes so that the pump does not overheat. To test to make sure the float switch is also working, or if your sump pump has a switch that plugs directly into the body of the pump, you will need to lift the float switch to its ‘on’ position. This will vary depending upon pump model so consult your owners’ manual for that information. To avoid possible electric shock, use a broom handle or similar non-conducting item to lift the float switch or pour about five gallons of water into the sump, and listen to the pump. The pump will run when the switch reaches its ‘on’ level.Make the switch turns on and off at least twice.
How many types of sump pumps are commonly in use?
There are four types of sump pumps commonly used – two are electric (pedestal and submersible) , one is water-powered while the fourth is available in either option.
What is a pedestal sump pump?
This type is an upright electric sump pump whose motor is located above the pump as it is not meant to get wet. It has a float-activated switch that turns the pump on when the water reaches a certain level. It is ideal for basements needing frequent water drainage. They are usually the least expensive but tend to be noisier than the submersibles.
What is a submersible sump pump?
This electric sump pump is installed in ground and specifically designed to function underwater. It has the same float-activated switch as the pedestal. Submersibles are more expensive, but boast a longer life than the pedestal type. Their sealed, oil-cooled motors are protected from moisture and dust, making them quieter.
What is a water powered sump pump?
Water powered - This type of sump pump runs off the water pressure from your home plumbing system. It has the same float-activated switch as the electric sump pump types, and handles water at a comparable rate. Since the water-powered pump requires no electricity to operate, it is often installed alongside an electric sump and used as a backup system during a power failure.
What is a floor sucker pump?
These sump pump types are used mostly in basements, cellars or crawl spaces which do not have an actual sump pit. They are called floor sucker pumps because they remove water to within a 1/8" of the floor (or other surfaces such as a roof or the ground). Available in various flow rates, under manual or automatic operation, while some are electronically controlled, the floor sucker pumps are versatile.
What is better, a Plastic vs. Cast Iron Construction sump pump?
All of the sump pump types are available in either plastic or cast iron. For the cost-conscious homeowner, plastic sump pumps will suit some applications, delivering a dependable product for a reasonable price. For contractor-grade, longer-lasting applications opt for the cast iron construction. No matter which one you have or have chosen, all sump pump types should have a check valve on the water outlet pipe in order to prevent the water from running back into the sump when the pump shuts off. Water flowing back and forth can cause the pump to turn on and off more than necessary and shorten the life of the pump. Choose the design and material of your sump pump based on the application in your home. Be it an electrical, water-powered or floor sucker model, your home is safer and more secure with a quality sump pump.
How do I check my sump pump operation?
It is important to check your sump pump regularly to make sure that it is in proper working condition. Remove the cover and slowly pour water into the sump tank. Watch for the "float" to rise and trigger the pump. Once the pump is engaged, the water level will quickly lower and the float will shut off the pump. This is what is called "a normal sump cycle". Most problems with the sump pump are float related. If the pump does not start, the float may be hanging on something in the tank. A simple repositioning of the pump should solve the problem. If this fails, the float may need replacement. If the pump fails to shut off when the water level drops to the bottom of the sump tank, this indicates a new float is needed.
What size sump pump should I buy?
Part of knowing how to buy a sump pump includes deciphering which size your house needs. There are two main measurements to consider: Size of the motor – measured in horsepower, ranging from 1/6 HP to 1/2 HP, the motor’s size often determines the pump’s effectiveness; note that the more powerful the motor, the higher the price; Capacity of the pump – often measured in gallons per hour or gallons per minute (GPH or GPM), this measurement is also connected to the head or lift of the pump Basically, you want to find out the capacity of the pump at the proper head (the distance vertically from the base of sump pit to the highest point of fluid discharge). It is also important to install a sump pump strong enough (motor and capacity) to allow some solids to pass through. Debris, such as bits of leaves or twigs, often makes its way into the pit and the pump should be able to handle it.
What about Power Back Up?
Although you may have bought the right type, size and capacity of sump pump for your home, it will be of little consequence if there is a power failure. While a wired-in sump pump functions well during normal conditions, having a water or battery operated back-up system or generator set-up is essential in order to ensure protection against flooding during a power outage.
Do I need a contractor to install a sump pump?
Depending on your comfort level with do-it-yourself installation (including wiring and mechanical work), hiring a professional is the safest way to install your sump pump.
What size pump should I have for my house?
There is no "correct" size. The horsepower requirement for a house is determined by the area of drainage connected to the sump, the depth to groundwater, the depth of the basement, & many other factors. A 1/3 hp pump is satisfactory for most houses.
Are there any problems with replacing a 1/3 hp pump with a 1/2 hp pump?
When used in similar conditions, a 1/2 hp pump will pump more water and lift it higher than a 1/3 hp pump. Most new sump pumps will have a chart or graph in the instructions or on the box that shows the flow versus height of lift for both sizes. The flow is usually given in either gallons per minute or gallons per hour (multiply gpm by 60 to convert to gph). The height of lift is given in feet of vertical lift. There shouldn't be any problem, but where the flow into the sump is relatively slow there would be no advantage to using the larger pump. However, in situations where water flow can become rapid, a 1/2 hp pump may be able to keep up w/ the flow where a 1/3 hp pump may not.
Do sump pumps have filters which need to be cleaned or replaced?
Sump pumps do not have filters, but they do have screens or small openings where the water enters the pump. These can sometimes be plugged.
Can or should you pump into a sewer drain or basement floor drain?
No, you should not. If you have a septic system, under no circumstances should the sump be pumped into the basement floor drain. During wet conditions the drainfield of the septic system is usually saturated & struggling to handle the normal flow of water from the house. Adding to it w/ a sump pump can damage the septic system. Even if you are connected to a public system the sump should not be pumped into a floor drain. Putting additional water into the sewer system can overload the public system & there may be a regulation against pumping into it.
Where should the sump pump drain hose run?
That is governed by local codes and ordinances. Preferably, sump water should be discharged at least 20 feet away from the house in such a way that it drains away from the house. It should not be directed onto a neighbor's lot, into window wells, or onto a septic system drainfield.
Should the sump pump be on an isolated electrical circuit?
A standard 15-amp, three-prong grounded outlet is sufficient to handle a sump pump. A sump pump is always in or near water, so you must use an outlet with a ground fault interrupter (GFI).
I don’t have a sump in my basement but am concerned about water leaking in. What can I do?
You can push the water to the floor drain, but if water backs up in the floor drain or drains very slowly a pump is needed. Small pumps sometimes referred to as "skimmer" pumps are designed to sit on a flat surface and pump when water on the floor is only 1/4 to 1/2 inch deep. They can often be used with a common garden hose. A 50-foot garden hose run out through a basement window will usually carry the water far enough away from the house. You can remove more water by taking the cover off the floor drain and placing the pump in the drain bowl -- these pumps are usually small enough to fit in the bowl. In emergencies where electric service is off, these pumps can be powered by a small gasoline generator.
How far can a sump pump push water up from the sump pit? Is it strong enough to pump up a 4-ft. pipe?
Most sump pumps are sized to provide the appropriate amount of flow at 10 ft of lift. The performance data on the product should indicate the maximum lift the pump can provide as well as the maximum flow rate.
When my sump pump flushes, it makes a loud banging sound. Do I need a check valve or something else to make this stop?
The noise is a result of water hammering, and a special check valve can be installed to quiet the racket. This device is commonly referred to as a quiet check valve or spring-loaded check valve.
We have two sump pumps. One runs quietly during pumping and at shutoff; the other pump has started making a loud "slurping" sound when it shuts off, similar to sucking on a straw at the bottom of a glass. Is there a way to adjust this noisy pump?
In this situation, the pump isn't turning off at the proper height. Inspect the "off" position of the switch and adjust it as needed so that it turns the pump off before the water reaches the intake area of the pump. It's common for the sump pump to leave several inches of water in the bottom of the basin when it turns off.
What kind of switch should be on the pump I buy?
There are basically three types of float switches: Tethered, vertical, electronic. The tethered style float switch is great for larger diameter, deeper sump pits. They allow the pump to be off longer between pump cycles so the motor can cool off more completely. At startup, the motor builds a lot of heat so having it be off longer between pump cycles allows it to cool more thoroughly. This can help the pump live longer and lower your overall power usage & costs. The vertical style switch is great if you have a sump pit that is too narrow and/or too shallow for a tethered style float switch. It is going to operate the pump more often but will not allow the water to get too deep. An electronic float switch has no moving parts and will take up a lot less space. It is perfect for a small sump pit and often includes options like a built-in water depth alarm, etc. Do not use an electronic float switch if the sump pit receives water from a laundry or wash sink as the soap can coat the electrodes causing it to malfunction. Likewise, soap scum can accumulate on the rod of a vertical style switch and cause sticking of the float.
How much horsepower do I need?
Horsepower basically does two things when choosing a pump: It moves the water out faster, and it (usually) uses more electricity. So there is a trade-off to be considered. If your sump pit fills up rapidly and you have a definite water problem, a higher horsepower pump is needed. In order to keep ahead of the incoming water and keep your basement dry, the higher horsepower pump can pump out the water before it can back up and overflow your sump pit. If you have such a water problem and you need a higher horsepower pump, it is best to increase the size of your sump pit (whenever possible) so that the pump does not have to run as often.
Could my sump pit be too big?
When it comes to sump pits, “bigger is better” is somewhat true. You want to have a sump pit large enough to use a pump with a tethered float switch. That allows a reasonable amount of water to accumulate before the pump has to run. The longer “off” time between pump cycles allows the pump to cool off more completely between pumping cycles. Keeping the pump cooler usually results in longer pump life.
Is it OK for my pump to pump out my water softener discharge?
In most cases the pump is NOT designed for that. The high salt content of water softener discharge is very corrosive and will attack the seals, the screws, and even the motor shaft. Salt can even damage many types of stainless steel. It is recommended that you find an alternate place for the water softener discharge.
Is it OK to dump the laundry water discharge into the sump pit?
Most sump pumps are designed for clear, clean ground water. The chemicals in laundry discharge can attack the seals on a sump pump. It’s possible for lint and other things discharged to get stuck in the impeller area and jam up the pump. Additionally, the soap scum that can be left behind from laundry water can foul the switch – this is particularly true of vertical switches. We recommend you purchase an effluent pump if you need to pump out laundry water.
What will happen if my outside discharge pipe freezes or is otherwise blocked?
If your discharge pipe freezes, or in any way becomes plugged, there is no place for the water to go when the pump runs. The pump is still going to run when the float switch is raised. If it cannot discharge the water through the regular discharge hose or pipe, it’s going to continue to run and run. This will eventually cause the pump to overheat and shut off due to its internal thermal overload protection. If the problem is not caught soon enough, it would be possible for your basement to flood. If the overload is stressed too often it’s also possible for the pump’s motor to be damaged or ruined by overheating.
What’s a check valve? Do I need one?
The short answer here is “Usually- yes.” A check valve is a one-way valve. It gets installed in the discharge pipe of your sump pump. When the pump runs, the water is forced out through the valve. When the pump shuts off, gravity wants the water in the discharge pipe to fall back into the sump pit. The check valve prevents that from happening. This prevents the pump from having to re-pump water that it has already pumped out. In the long run, this should extend the life of the pump and save you electricity.
My power outlet is too far away from the sump pit. Can I use an extension cord?
We very strongly recommend that you NOT use an extension cord. It is MUCH better to plug the pump into a dedicated outlet that is fed by a circuit breaker or fuse that feeds power ONLY to that outlet. This ensures that the pump will receive proper voltage. If there is no outlet near the sump pit, we recommend you have one installed there by a professional electrician.
Do I need a backup pump? Or a second pump?
Having a backup or secondary pump is like having insurance on your car or home. It’s only needed when it’s NEEDED. A backup pump can be standing by and operate when your main pump cannot. This may be because of a power outage, an extreme amount of incoming water, or even main pump failure. Having a second AC-powered sump pump in the pit can protect you in case the main pump simply can’t keep up, or if the main pump fails, but it cannot help you if the power goes out.
What kind of backup pumps are available?
There are two main kinds of backup pump systems: Battery powered and city water powered. The battery backup systems use a 12 volt marine type battery. The system keeps the battery charged and monitors a separate float switch in the pit. If that second float switch is raised high enough, the control system turns on the 12 volt pump that is mounted in the sump pit. This 12 volt backup pump then pumps the water out. These systems are usually equipped with an alarm that warns you when the backup pump has had to operate. This tells you there may have been a power outage or that you may have a problem with your main sump pump. City water powered systems use water power to move the water out. The city water comes in through a pipe to the backup pump. It spins an impeller much the same way a motor would. The impeller moves the sump water out and both the sump water and city water are discharged outside.
How long should my sump pump last?
This is almost impossible to answer. If you have a small sump pit, and you have a lot of ground water in your area, the pump may have to run several times per hour. Naturally, that pump is not going to last as long as the same pump in the home of someone with a large sump pit and very little ground water where the pump only has to run a few times a year. Choosing a pump that is properly sized to your ground water conditions, has the appropriate float switch for your sump pit, and has good electrical supply connected to it will ensure the longest possible life for your pump.
Do you sell parts to repair my pump?
We do not sell parts….Installation and parts manuals are provided only as reference tools. Neither the manufacturer nor King Pumps makes any representation or warranty of any kind to the Buyer that he or she is qualified to neither install nor make any repairs to the product. In fact, the manufacturer and King Pumps expressly state that installation, repairs and parts replacements should be undertaken by qualified and competent technicians or contractors and not by the Buyer. The Buyer assumes all risk and liability arising out of his or her installation or repair to the original product.
What size generator do I need to run this pump?
You need to know the amp draw of the pump and multiply that by the voltage to get the watt usage of the pump. Example: Pump draws 5 amps on 115 volts. 5amps x 115volts = 575 watts. We also need to consider the fact that an AC motor can draw three to five times its regular amp draw for about ½ second when it starts up. So to run our example pump, we need a generator that can supply a startup surge of at least 2875 watts (575 x 5) and can continue to supply the 575 watts as the pump runs. Keep in mind this is accurate if the pump is the ONLY thing the generator is going to supply power for. If you also want to run lights, etc. then that needs to be added to the generator size.

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