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Liquid Level Alarms

Level Alarms

Alarm systems are used whenever liquid levels need to be monitored. In the event of pump malfunction, power loss or circuit failure, a system of lights and audible alarms can alert the resident or service personnel of the problem. Alarm systems are recommended in most residential, commercial, industrial, agricultural and municipal applications for the monitoring of sump pump basins, sewage basins, cisterns, septic tanks, elevator pits, chemical solution tanks and more.

Questions & Answers

Qualified and competent personnel should install the control panel and floats. We recommend that a licensed contractor install, troubleshoot and repair all new systems and replace existing units. Failure to install in compliance with local and national codes and manufacturers recommendations may result in electrical shock, fire hazard, unsatisfactory performance, and equipment failure.
Alarm: Inspect the alarm power cord for damage. Power-in lines should be connected to the terminal strip inside the alarm enclosure. Check the installation instructions for correct terminal positions. For the Tank Alertģ 4X, inspect the fuse inside the alarm panel. If fuse is burnt out, replace with same type of fuse. If the wiring is consistent with the installation instructions, remove the float wires and install a jumper wire across the terminal positions where the float was connected. Turn on power. If the alarm does not activate, there may be a problem with the alarm panel. If the alarm does activate, there may be a problem with the float. Float: Check the installation instructions for correct terminal positions. Check the connection between the float cable leads and the terminal strip. Check the float for proper positioning, tether length, or obstructions which may have caused the float to hang-up. Inspect the float cable for damage. To test for continuity: Disconnect the float cable leads from the screw terminals. Connect a volt/ohm meter to the black and white leads. Move the float to the "on" position (up for normally open models, down for normally closed models). If the volt/ohm meter reads no continuity, return the switch to your supplier. Note: Check wiring from float to alarm; if there is a problem with the wiring from the float to the alarm, it can read no continuity. Make sure the float switch is the correct model for the application. A Normally Open (NO) float switch is used for high level alarm applications and Normally Closed (NC) float switch is used for low level alarm applications.
The screw terminals are for connection of the float switch only. The screw terminals should not be connected to an external power source or to contacts which provide an external power source.
The float switch closes the alarm circuit inside the alarm. It should not be connected to an external power source.
There may be a problem with the alarm. Check to see if there is power to the unit. Remove the battery if one is installed. Push the "Test" button. If the red light comes on and the horn sounds then the alarm has power. There may be problems with the green LED. (Unit must be returned to the factory for repair) . Note: The "Test" button tests the functionality of the alarm, not the whole system. Inspect the power cord for damage.
There may be a problem with the alarm wiring or the control switch. (up for a high level application or down for a low level application) Push the test button. Horn and red light should come on. If they do not, return unit to the factory.
There may be a problem with the alarm wiring or the control switch. (up for a normally closed application or down for a for a normally open application).
Disconnect power. Place the meter leads on flat plug terminals. If the volt/ohm meter reads no continuity, there may be a problem with one of the alarm circuit elements. Unit must be returned to the factory for repair.
Disconnect the float cable leads from the screw terminals. Connect a volt/ohm meter to the white and black leads. Move the float to the "on" position (up for high level alarm models, down for low level alarm models). If the volt/ohm meter reads no continuity, there may be a problem with the switch circuit elements.
Make sure the float switch is the correct model for the application. A Normally Open (NO) float switch is used for high level alarm applications and Normally Closed (NC) float switch is used for low level alarm applications. Check the label on the float switch cable. If the cable label is gone, disconnect the float wires from the alarm panel and place meter leads on wires from floats. Check the float for proper positioning, tether length, or obstructions which may have caused the float to hang-up. Inspect the float cable for damage.
Raise the float up. If the meter shows continuity, the float switch is a high level normally open alarm model. - Lower the float down. If the meter shows continuity, the float switch is a low level normally closed alarm model.
Check the float for proper positioning, tether length, or obstructions which may have caused the float to hang-up. Inspect the float cable for damage.
Verify that a battery is installed and working.
The voltage of the unit is listed on the ratings label on the back of the alarm. The internal components of the 120 VAC Tank Alert will be damaged if 230 VAC is applied. The 230 VAC Tank Alert will not operate on 120 VAC. In the absence of a label check the voltage with a volt/ohm meter.
Disconnect alarm from power source. Place the meter leads on flat plug terminals. If the plug has been removed, place meter leads on bare wires at the end of the power cord. - Approximately 150 ohms indicates a 120 VAC Tank Alert- approximately 1000 ohms indicates a 230 VAC Tank Alert.
If the cable label is gone: Raise the float up. If the alarm activates, the float switch is a high level alarm model. Lower the float down. If the alarm activates, the float switch is a low level alarm model. Check the installation instructions for correct terminal positions. Check the connection between the float cable leads and the terminal strip. Inspect the alarm power cord for damage. Check the float for proper positioning, tether length, or obstructions which may have caused the float to hang-up. Inspect the float cable for damage.
There may be a problem with the alarm wiring, the alarm light, the control switch, or other panel components. (up for a high level alarm application or down for a low level alarm application). Disconnect power.

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